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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
by violence and gun violence. so i think that moving forward you will continue to hear president obama make these types of broad-based arguments in terms of the policy and getting stiffer gun legislation passed. you also heard president obama saying some of the measures he is calling for deserve a vote. realistically does he expect a reinstatement of the ban on assault weapons? probably not. he will continue to call for a vote but i think today is an indication that he's going to continue to press for other things like improving mental health services, early childhood education, and alongside that continue to fight for the legislation in terms of what is realistic, probably most likely getting universal background checks. that seems to have the broadest base of support at this time, martin, but we're really getting a window into the tactic this president will take moving forward as he does try to combat gun violence. again, getting personal today. it reminded me of his state of the union address when he had that rousing finish at the end which was also quite emotional when he spoke to the v
happened. sick stuff. and it seems to be growing in inverse proportion to obama's popularity. the better he looks, the worse these characters, inhofe, cruz, mccain, and lindsey graham, are determined to look. did you notice the smile on john boehner's face sitting up there behind the president during the state of the union? if you did, you're imagining things. so afraid of the hard hating right of republicans these days of every stripe, even boehner's scared to death of looking like he might like something barack obama had to say. to do that is to risk political death in these days. let's go at it. our guests are joy reid of the grio and michael steele, former chairman of the republican national committee. both are msnbc analysts and good ones. let's take a look at this. is this delay on the hagel vote about playing for time hoping new information comes out about them? "the new york times" reports today that anti-hagel groups are right now hoping for exactly that. quote, leaders of these groups said in interviews that they expected their efforts to include more phone calls urging conservati
couldn't stand george w. bush. he was denied it again so he couldn't stand barack obama and can't stand anyone that barack obama nominates. and the surge was something that was his. i think that almost in a way john mccain made the surge into the war as john mccain would have fought it as commander-in-chief, and anyone who questions it gets the wrath of mccain. and i watched that hearing or that part of the hearing with colonel jack jacobs and patrick murphy, the former congressman of pennsylvania that served in iraq. both of those guys have been at the bottom of the pile, as jack jacobs calls it, like hagel and mccain, you just view war differently. but the lesson these two men took from vietnam seems to be so different. hagel took the questioning, the same thing patrick murphy feels, being lied to and knowing that anger that your friends died for what you believe to be a lie. mccain seems to have taken something different from it. >> we're all different. here is chuck hagel in vietnam back in '68 when he went in. he was an enlisted soldier and rose to sergeant. a noncommissioned offic
with obama? why can't politics be a matter of belief and honest disagreement, not hatred? why the sick little intramurals we saw today? we begin with senator jeanne shaheen of new hampshire. i want you to watch this back-and-forth between john mccain and the witness today, chuck hagel. let's take a look. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? >> my -- >> yes or no. >> my reference -- >> can you answer the question, senator hagel? the question is, were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> well -- >> i would like to answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer -- >> well, let the record show you refused to answer this question. now, please go ahead. >> if you would like me to explain why -- >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that, as i have already said
and president obama releasing some records is a positive first step. but there's going to be a president after president obama. and who knows how that leader will handle these serious matters. there must be consistency from one administration to the next. even though i trust president obama. if we set a president now, are we going to live with that if the next president is someone we don't agree with? no matter the politics, that's the question we should think about. policy should be around the precedent we set. no president should be able to go unchecked. i was opposed to it under bush. i'm opposed to it now. i'm afraid for the future. we must watch this carefully. i'm a.m. sharpton, thanks for watching. "hardball" starts right now. >> defending the drones, let's play "hardball" ♪ >>> good evening. i'm michael smerconish in for chris matthews. secrets and spies. the man who is at the center of the national debate over the targeted killing of americans overseas has been in the hot seat on capitol hill. among other things, john brennan coordinates the kill list, and so his confirmation hearin
of it. i hear often from radio listeners who sense a hypocrisy in that they see the obama administration being critical of harsh interrogation methods but going along with the drone program. is there some inherent hypocrisy in that? >> well, there was an interesting statistic in the first year of the obama administration. i think -- or perhaps over the first couple of years in the administration. he authorized more drone strikes and more people were killed in drone strikes that he authorized than the total number of people that had before passed through guantanamo bay. that crystallizes that hypocrisy people talk about. >> you could also argue that we know drone strikes work. you know, the jury still seems like it's out with regard to harsh interrogation methods, but drone strikes work. >> in terms of the morality, you know, if you determine that there are threats out there, there are bad guys that you need to take off the battlefield but you can't go there, you can't go to pakistan, you can't go to certain places, then what alternative do you have if you can't capture them? in other wor
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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